Position of Adverbs in a Sentence

Learners often have difficulties with putting adverbs in the correct position in sentences. In this article, we’ll talk about different types of adverbs and their positions.

We can use adverbs at the beginning, in the middle or at the end of a sentence. Different types of adverbs are used in different positions.

Adverbs of manner

Adverbs of manner are usually used at the end of a sentence:

  • Thomas was chewing loudly.
  • The girl danced beautifully.
  • Leanne closed the door quietly.

Adverbs of place

We often use adverbs of place at the end of a sentence. In writing, we sometimes use them at the beginning too:

  • They are sitting over there.
  • The dog is running around outside.
  • Inside, there were wooden floors.

Adverbs of time

Adverbs of time (e.g., early, today, late, etc.) are usually used at the end of a sentence. However, we sometimes use them at the beginning, to make them the focus of the sentence:

  • We’re going to the zoo today.
  • I washed my car yesterday.
  • Tomorrow, I am flying to Greece.

Adverbs of frequency

Adverbs of frequency are normally used in the middle of a sentence, between the subject and the main verb. But we sometimes use them at the beginning or the end too:

  • We usually eat out on Fridays.
  • Sometimes I go cycling.
  • I don’t travel very often.
Note: ‘Always’ and ‘never’ are not used at the beginning of a sentence. They are usually used in the middle, between the subject and the main verb:

– I always go on holiday in July.
NOT: Always I go on holiday in July.

I never miss the bus.
NOT: Never I miss the bus.

Adverbs of degree

Adverbs of degree are usually used in the middle of a sentence, between the subject and the main verb. They can also be used between an auxiliary verb and an adjective. In addition, we can put them between the main verb and an adverb of manner too:

  • I really enjoyed the show.
  • He is very scared.
  • Veronica can run extremely quickly.

Adverbs of probability

We often use adverbs of probability in the middle of a sentence, between the auxiliary verb and the main verb or an adjective. However, sometimes we use them at the beginning of a sentence:

  • I will probably go to the party.
  • I can certainly help you.
  • Maybe it will rain.

Here’s a good video from 7ESL explaining the use of adverbs in different positions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=83bwFqflE28

More on adverbs:

Adverbs: Also, As Well, So, Too, Either, Neither

Adverbs: About to, Already, Just, Still, Yet

How to Form Adverbs

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